Auctor
A journal for postgraduates in Classics

By: auctor.journal | September 16, 2016

This paper presents a general overview of Barbegal watermill complex, including the fundamental bibliography, for a complete description of the site. This is a battery of multiple-wheeled mills located in the Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis, in southern France. The structure and the operation of the watermill complex are clearly described. It consisted of 16 industrial grain mills, arranged in two parallel rows, installed on a slope. The watermill complex was furnished by the system of aqueducts (Saint Remy and des Baux) that conveyed the water to the nearby town of Arles. Furthermore, the paragraph of the chronology and the building phases of the complex takes into account the important analysis of calcareous concretions conducted by ...

By: auctor.journal | September 15, 2016

John Buchan was the author of The Thirty Nine Steps, and also an accomplished Classicist who became Governor General of Canada (1935–1940). In Canada he wrote a scholarly biography of Augustus (1937), having earlier written a short biographical sketch of Julius Caesar (1932). He was also a committed Calvinist who believed in predestination. In Classics he found a secular reflection of Calvinism, with each reinforcing the other to create a unique reception of the ancient world for Buchan. Buchan’s essay ‘The Great Captains’ (1926) reveals his belief that national leaders should have spirituality and morality. This grants the ‘Great Captain’ some perception of God’s Will for this world, whatever his religious convictions, and facilitates an u...

By: auctor.journal | September 15, 2016

Ariosto’s Orlando Furioso, published in its complete form in 1532, is a complex interweaving of the classical genre of epic and the chivalric romances popular in the Medieval/Early Modern period. The poem draws on a wide selection of ancient influences, ranging from Homer and Virgil to Ovid and Statius. The focal point of this article will be one of Ariosto’s protagonists, the Saracen Rodomonte: the frequent depictions of this character in the guise of such (anti-)heroes as the Virgilian Turnus or Pyrrhus, and his multiple appearances as the subject of extended classical similes make Rodomonte a figure of particular interest for a study of the reception of Classics in the Orlando Furioso. This article argues that in his fusing of romance an...

By: auctor.journal | September 15, 2016

In 1858 Cavalier Guidi, owner of the area on the east side of the Thermae Antoninianae, decided to make an archaeological excavation on his property, perhaps aware that the Horti Asiniani were supposed to lay in that area. The first trench revealed the presence of an ancient domus, extending between the central building of the Baths and the fence.
Cavalier Guidi made a series of excavations between 1858 and 1866, discovering part of an extensive two-floor domus belonging to the Hadrianic period. The domus was not completely unearthed, but many mosaics, opus sectile pavements and wall paintings were discovered and described by several archaeologists. Unfortunately, the domus was badly damaged by a flood in 1870.
Only as recently as 1970 and 19...

By: auctor.journal | September 15, 2016

Private associations ofthe Graeco-Roman world have been examined in terms ofconflict and control towards the state, as engines of sociability for the workers, and they were compared with the early Christian communities. Lately, they are perceived as integrated parts of the cities, as sources for personal identification and vehicles for civic integration. What has not been examined so far is whether these groups can be understood as agents of identities exceeding the polis borders? Could they have functioned as brokers of identities transgressing time and space, in other words as brokers of cultural memory and tradition? As it was the capital of Macedonia, a region that can be seen as a distinct cultural entity throughout Classical Antiquity...

By: auctor.journal | September 15, 2016

The matter of Roman soldiers in service in the overseas provinces and their position in relation to the census held by the Republic is a well-known source of controversy. This paper focuses on three different occasions: first, the Second Punic War, and the two censuses of 207 and 204 BC. Second, the period between 194 and 164 BC, and then the much discussed period between 159 and 125 BC. Finally, we will examine the purpose of the census figures, and who was included in them. By doing so, it is possible to better understand the role of overseas soldiers in the census figures.
This paper will not put forward a definitive solution to this debate, but I believe it will suggest interesting arguments, and, especially, will highlight the fundament...

By: auctor.journal | September 15, 2016

This article seeks to re-examine the involvement of Attalos I in mainland Greece and the Aegean and to offer a new interpretation ofthe king’s intentions and ambitions. Often portrayed as an unenthusiastic participant in Greek affairs, this paper argues that Attalos’s policy in Greece is more in keeping with the aggressive expansion and plundering of Hellenistic kings. By taking a chronological approach to Attalos’s relations with Greece and the Aegean, this paper traces the development of Attalos’s policy from before the First Macedonian War to the Peace of Flamininus, ultimately revealing a policy that became increasingly guided by expansionism as Attalos became more active and involved in Greece. In assessing the ancient evidence, a narr...

By: auctor.journal | September 15, 2016

This paper provides a defence of Porson’s conjecture in Epicharmus’ fragment 77 K.-A. Although scholars have proposed various emendations to the crux in order to explain the manner of performing the iamboi mentioned in the text, they suppose something in the poetic background for which there is no actual evidence. Taking into account two parallels in Pindar and in a fragment ofEupolis, the author ofthis paper suggests that Epicharmus could have deal with the contrast between old and new poetic τρόποι.

By: auctor.journal | September 15, 2016

This paper investigates what new interpretations can be offered when speeches in Xenophon’s Hellenica are examined as successful and unsuccessful persuasion attempts situated within their narrative contexts. When used to interpret the speech given by a man in defence, before the Theban council, for his killing of the Sicyonian tyrant Euphron (Hellenica 7.3.7–11), such a rhetorical and narratological approach seems to give an insight into Xenophon’s interest in how people persuade. Unlike previous interpretations, I argue that the speech and the immediately subsequent narrative investigate the effectiveness of the particular persuasive strategy adopted. The speaker persuades his audience that he is their benefactor and they do not punish him...

By: auctor.journal | September 15, 2016

The abbreviation “ΜΥΘ” is found six times in the marginal annotations of ps-Antigonos’ text, a collection of extraordinary stories, alongside the more frequent seen “ΣΗ”. The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature of the abbreviation. Firstly, what does it stand for: is this mythos or its derivatives? Then, on what grounds is a passage qualified as mythos. This study intends to shed more light on the perception of mythos, especially in Antigonos’ text.